The Sower, July 13

Title:The Sower, July 13

  Sunday, July 13, 2014  (full size gallery)

A full day at St. Peter’s. 30 at Church at 11 and 125 at the funeral of Genevieve Davis. The day began early as Eunice’s food crew began arriving. Cookie worked with the flowers and Roger hosed off the tables. The day was going to be hot early on. Still the crepe myrtle were beautiful in the adjacent Heinbach yard. The osprey are growing close to the river and a new bird has taken up in the front sycamore.

The readings are here and the sermon as well as the bulletin 

We wished Laura a happy birthday and plans for the funeral were presented with Helmut announcing his toast for her after the funeral.

Many thanks for the funeral preparations – Altar Guild (Nancy, Marian, Andrea, Mary Ann), The Fishers for serving, Eunice and crew for the reception, Roger and Charles for cleaning and general tasks, Helmut for the toast, Johnny and the lectors, Marilyn for her contemplative harp playing, Nancy for her moving acapella Lord’s prayer, Storke’s Funeral Home. Catherine’s homily is here

David Storke said one of the most unusual touches of this funeral- a toast for Genevieve led by Helmut.  


This week the emphasis was how we play our stories in the world.

The New Testament readings provide guidance on reacting to Jesus ministry and work with our own. It is empowered by the spirit to be about the spirit. We must be careful to seek that world – the world according to the spirit and not the flesh

Those whose lives are motivated and powered by earthly goals and passions, no matter how "good" they may be, are in opposition to God. Those who offer the Gospel to the world often seem to squander so much of their time and resources with little chance of a return but we can be assured that Jesus has invested in each one of us as his disciples. We become life giving to each other as God has been to us.

Perhaps here the sower is anyone who tells the good news. Growth represents receptivity. It could be you or me. It could be God. It could be Jesus. The sower scatters his seed generously and seems to waste so much of it on ground that holds little promise of a rich harvest. Those who offer the Gospel to the world often seem to squander so much of their time and resources with little chance of a return but we can be assured that Jesus has invested in each one of us as his disciples. He too seemingly squandered his time with all sorts of people, outcasts of all hues and yet the harvest has already been a good one. Surely a great encouragement for us all!

For Paul if we promote God’s teaching and goals as agents of God then we are acting according the spirit. If we look selfishly to our own then we are not.

Are we brave enough to step out of our comfort zones? Do we hold on rather too tightly to our resources, making sure we have something in reserve for the proverbial rainy day or should we imitate the sower in our own generosity?

The sower seems to lead to the idea that disciples are not always the chosen. It seems that these will often be the most unlikely candidates; the people that the world does not rate, the goats rather than the sheep, the tax collectors and the prostitutes rather than the respectable. These are the ones that will go ahead of the religious leaders of the day into heaven! And what of the disciples? Is there hope for them too? Time and again they are found wanting in understanding, in faith and in courage but the encouraging thing for all of us is that Jesus doesn’t give up on them. In fact, he continues to invest in them, even to the point of entrusting the future of his mission to them. The disciples will bring others to Christ

It may take time for results to appear as Isaiah seems to say. It’s the environment that causes the sowers crop to eventually turn into bread as Isaiah says. God will make the peoples’ religious lives fruitful, as he has done for their land.

God’s presence is shown as powerful, gracious, and life-giving in the Psalm. The dangerous features of nature are pacified, and the rest of nature comes to life with joyful exuberance. God’s presence is shown as powerful, gracious, and life-giving in the psalm. The dangerous features of nature are pacified, and the rest of nature comes to life with joyful exuberance. As with the sower’s seeds, results don’t happen over night and patience is a must. As Walter Bouzard writes about the Psalm, “The motion of the psalm from quiet, expectant waiting to a summons for the creation itself to join the choir of praise suggests that the journey from expectation to exaltation is just that — a journey. Many of us, perhaps most of us, find ourselves somewhere in the middle of the journey.” 
 

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